Which End of a Bar Magnet Do Magnetic Field Lines Emerge From?

by Harry Harry
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Magnet

The magnetic field lines from a bar magnet emerge from the north end of the magnet.

This is because, as you travel from south to north along the length of a bar magnet, each successive loop in the magnetic field gets smaller and closer together than it was before. As this occurs, there are more loops from which to choose on the northern side of the magnet than on its southern side (since there is more area), so that’s where most of them emerge from. The magnetic field lines from a bar magnet emerge from the north end of the magnet. This is because, as you travel from south to north along the length of a bar magnet, each successive loop in the magnetic field gets smaller and closer together than it was before. As this occurs, there are more loops from which to choose on the northern side of the magnet than on its southern side (since there is more area), so that’s where most of them emerge from. The configuration looks like this: [[file:///Users/Meinhardt%20Cohnsack/Pictures/Image%2002-06-00010_20190305184851_000x480.jpg|200px]]

If we take a bar magnet and cut it in half from north to south, we will have two magnets. If we then stack them up so that the north pole of one magnet is facing the same direction as the south pole of another magnet, they will attract each other (like poles). This can be seen below: If this procedure was not followed when stacking these magnets together, than whatever side faces outwards from its neighbor would repel instead of attract due to magnetic polarity. We can see an example where this does happen

in the diagram below: [[file:///Users/Meinhardt%20Cohnsack/Pictures/Image%2002-06-00010_20190305184851_000x480.jpg|200px]]

The side that is facing out from its neighbor will be repelling because of magnetic polarity, and from this end (north) will come a field line with an arrow pointing away from it. This means that most common configuration for these two magnets to attract each other would have their north poles face inwards towards each other while they are stacked on top of one another, so that way at least one pole faces south like its neighbors’. So which end does generate magnetic field lines? The north pole!

Some Other Points from the Topic:

Magnetic field lines are imaginary lines that represent the direction and strength of a magnetic force. The two ends (north or south) of a bar magnet will both generate magnetic field lines from their respective poles, but from different directions which one is stronger depends on how they are oriented relative to one another.

For example if you have two north facing magnets next to each other then in most cases it would be weaker than if you had them oppositely polarized with the North Pole pointing outward towards its neighbor as opposed to being inside facing outwards like before. This difference can also make it difficult for these types of magnets to attract each other when they’re not made properly by leaving an end on either pole point from one magnet to the other. The magnetic field is stronger from the south end of a bar magnet then from its north pole, and vice versa in relation to magnets that have their opposite ends facing each other.

In most cases, it’s easier for two like poles (North) or unlike poles (South) to attract than when they are oppositely polarized because there will be more total lines drawn out from both sides rather than just one side.”}

“The North Pole points outward towards its neighbor as opposed to being inside pointing outwards like before.” – “This difference can also make it difficult for these types of magnets to attract each other when they’re not made properly by leaving an end on either

Magnetic field lines from a bar magnet emerge from the North Pole of the magnetic field. Magnetic fields are created by electric currents looping around and flowing in closed loops through space. The current is what creates the magnetic field, not just an isolated wire itself carrying electrical charge without any movement or change in direction anywhere else in its circuit. All these movements create circulations that produce magnetic fields which will be strongest at their source – near where they originate from on one side of this flow (north pole) for example – but weaker as you move away from that region. These can generate “lines” along which we measure things like how strong a particular type of magnetism is or even sense back to see if there might have been some sort of

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