15 Sins of Samoan Names and How to Avoid Them

by Radhe Gupta
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When you think of sin, do you think about the sins that are committed against other people? Or is it a more personal “sins” list – those things someone does themselves to commit wrongdoings. Well if you’re Samoan and have a name on your birth certificate from the country of Samoa, then chances are good that one or more of these 15 sins were committed during its creation! Read this blog post to find out what they are and how to avoid them so that your name can be as beautiful as possible.

I. Sin #01: Adding a letter that does not exist in Samoan to the beginning of your name

We know how it goes – you’re researching for names and come across something pretty awesome from Samoa, but then trip up on one small detail.. It’s got an extra H at the beginning! That can’t be right, so now we have two choices: give up or add one ourselves. The first is tempting because this would mean more time spent on research instead of creating (but what if there are other sins?). Second option isn’t any better though either because even if it were possible to find a word without that pesky extra letter that doesn’t exist in the language, adding letters like these will only make your name look foolish.

II. Sin #02: Pluralizing your name to avoid bad luck

Brought on by the belief that names with more than one letter can bring negative energies, Samoan parents would often add an “s” or two to their child’s name in order to diffuse any potential danger (examples include Seseli and Itupela). The problem is this doesn’t work because each sin still has a number of letters associated with it – you’re not fooling anyone! Plus there are plenty of other ways around bad luck; for example, some people will keep an item from what they consider good fortune for themselves as a talisman against possible misfortune. Lastly, maybe changing your last initial could be worth trying out (exple: Joe turns into J.O.).

II. Sin #03: Giving your child a name that is more than four letters long

Although this sin might seem like the most common, it’s not because there are plenty of Samoan names with five or six letters! Why? The belief is that these extra two-or-three letter combinations will carry on bad luck and misfortune (just wondering if anyone else has noticed how many words in English have at least five letters?). All you can really do to counteract this curse is try to avoid naming them after food items – I know what I’m doing when my children come along.. ;)

IV. Sin #06: Giving your child an embarrassing nickname as their legal name

This sin is a little less common in Western cultures, but it’s still something to be mindful of when you’re selecting your child’s name. It can lead to unnecessary teasing and bullying from the other kids at school or church (especially if they are dealing with dyslexia). The best thing for parents to do is choose names that their children will like growing up – even if it means changing initials! If no one else knows how to spell their legal name, then they won’t have any reason to tease them about their nickname.

VI. Sin #09: Giving your child a Samoan Name that doesn’t sound good in English because there aren’t enough vowels

I’m guilty of this sin! When I was naming our daughter, my husband and I knew we wanted to give her a Samoan name that meant “fairy”. Our only problem? We couldn’t agree on what the pronunciation should be. Eventually this led us to settle for an English-sounding version of the word, which is now spelled as Reily (pronounced like Reely).

This sin can happen when you’re going back and forth between languages during pregnancy or talking about baby names with your partner. For example, if they both want different versions of ʻAeona but don’t want to argue over it all night long – then just go ahead and call them ‘Ana! You could also do this by spelling out their name, for example “Evelina” instead of “Eva-Leena”.

This is the most important sin to avoid! If you don’t want your child’s name to change, pick a spelling that everyone can agree on. This will save you some trouble later in life when they’re finally old enough to choose their own names and have opinions about them!

In this post I’m going over 15 sins of Samoan baby naming traditions and how to avoid them if possible. There are plenty more than just these fifteen but perhaps at least now, you’ll know what not do when naming your next little one (or maybe even yourself!). Have fun with it – as long as everyone agrees on the spelling then good luck picking out what you want.

This is the most important sin to avoid! If you don’t want your child’s name to change, pick a spelling that everyone can agree on. This will save you some trouble later in life when they’re finally old enough to choose their own names and have opinions about them! In this post I’m going over 15 sins of Samoan baby naming traditions and how to avoid them if possible. There are plenty more than just these fifteen but perhaps at least now, you’ll know what not do when naming your next little one (or maybe even yourself!). Have fun with it – as long as everyone agrees on the spelling then good luck picking out what you want.

– Every letter needs an accent mark: “A”, “E”, “I, O and U”

– Two Vowels together: Avoid combinations such as AO or AU

– No more than three syllables in the name (this includes all vowels)

– The longer your last name is, the shorter the first name should be. This will help when it comes time for their social security number. Of course not everyone follows this rule but I know my friend with a really long Samoan surname had to take her baby’s middle name from her husband’s family because they ran out of room on hers. So if you’re going by traditional naming rules then keep this in mind!

– Last names are usually taken straight off one grandparent so don

Every culture has their own set of rules when it comes to naming a child. The Samoan islands are no different. We have our own standards and guidelines that you must follow in order for your baby’s name to be deemed “acceptable.” If not, then parents will often change the last name or add an additional title to make sure they’re following all the right steps. But even with these precautions, many mistakes can still happen – most commonly being called by the wrong title because someone doesn’t know which one goes first!

This blog post is more than one way 15 Sinful Sins of Samoan Names and How to Avoid Them Samoans love their names. When it comes to giving a baby the name, you can’t just go ahead and do whatever pops into your head. You have to think about how that person will grow up with this name, carry it around for life. So if you want them to be happy from now until forever – these are 15 sins of samoan names (and how to avoid them) so you don’t commit these mistakes in naming your babe! Lying: this one is pretty self-explanatory but I still feel like pointing out some reasons why lying isn’t good enough when choosing a child’s name. What does his/

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